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  • Overview
  • Itinerary & Map
  • What's Included
  • Photos
  • And more...
Overview
For dates, availability & customisations Enquire

Bucket List Walk

Start:RotoruaTours run:November to April
End:Rotorua
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mild grade
Duration:12 days/11 nights
NZ $4,950.00
excl GST
Walking
 






 

QualmarkweeGold copy    Walking holiday of a lifetime!

 

Explore the very best of the North Island’s diverse and visually spectacular regions in comfort and style.

From the majestic mountains of Tongariro, to the lush forests of Waikaremoana, to the dramatic coastlines of Coromandel.

Be awed by the scenery, and spoilt by delightful accommodation, meals and wine - It doesn’t get any better than this!
  • Join a small group & expert NZ walking guide
  • 12 days / 11 nights NZ Walking Tour (11 days walking, 1 rest day)
  • 4-7 hours walking each day over varied terrain on formed trails
  • Carry a daypack only
  • 100 - 120km (62 - 74 miles)
  • Depart Rotorua or Matamata
  • NZD$3000 per child (15 years and under)
 

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Includes: most meals, snacks & wine; return Rotorua transport; 9 nights 3-4 star lodge accommodation (mix of shared & ensuite facilities); 2 nights 4.5-star hotel accommodation; dinner in a top Rotorua restaurant; boat cruises; hot spring swims; experienced and caring guides


Book now for Next Season!

 

2018 / 2019

2018

November 5,19
December 3, 10
 

2019

January 7, 14, 28
February 4,11,25
March 4,11,25
April 8

Another date in mind?

We can build a tour especially for your group, please enquire for dates available.

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Dates and Availability?

Tours run:November to April
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Customisations?

We can customise tours to suit.

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Itinerary & Map

For dates, availability & customisations Enquire
 






DAY ONE – Matamata / Rotorua to Coromandel

Rotorua accommodation pick-ups approx. 8:30am Matamata accommodation pick-ups approx. 9:30am
Warm up with a 4km hike to the top of Wairere Falls, the North Island’s highest waterfall, and view the verdant Waikato basin from two lookouts over- hanging 90 metres of thunderous waterfall.
We continue north to explore the Waiomu Kauri Grove - this little known trail heads deep into a protected ecological reserve scattered with magnificent Kauri trees – New Zealand’s very own forest giants that grow up to 50 metres tall. Drive further up the Coromandel Peninsula in the late afternoon to reach our lovely accommodation, and watch the sunset from the verandah with a glass of wine or ice cold brew.
Accommodation: Hush Cabins, Coromandel - (L,D)
Hiking time: 3-4 hours.
Driving time Matamata to Coromandel: 2 hours


DAY TWO – The Legendary Coromandel Coastal Walkway

Enjoy a hearty breakfast in the alfresco dining area of the lodge, surrounded by native bush and birdsong.
We then head north to the tip of the Coromandel Peninsula to hike one of the best coastal walks in the country. We begin our hike at Stony Bay, a picture perfect isolated beach
flanked by green hills and white sand. This historic trail follows an old bridle path once used by gold miners who populated the Coromandel region in colonial times.
The track passes through farmland and native bush to reach the remote and beautiful Poley Bay – a fantastic beach for a picnic! This stretch of coastline offers all the dramatic views that encapsulate the Coromandel.
Accommodation: Hush Cabins, Coromandel - (B,L,D)
Hiking time: 6 hours.
Driving time: 3 hours.


DAY THREE – The Pinnacles

This morning we head south and enter the hidden world of the Kauaeranga Valley, home to the majestic Pinnacles range. The entire length of the Coromandel Peninsula was once a chain of volcanic cones. This chain has since been eroded and weathered to form the spectacular series of outcrops you see today. The Pinnacles trail climbs through re-generating kauri forest, passing one of NZ’s best preserved kauri dams, eventually cresting the top of the range to reach the Pinnacles Hut. From the hut, an optional scramble to the top of the Pinnacles rock formation rewards you with 360° views of the entire Coromandel Peninsula and beyond.
If the Pinnacles isn’t your style and you would prefer a more relaxing day you have the option of staying in and exploring Coromandel Township. Highlights include the Driving Creek Railway, local artisan workshops, colourful cafes, and Kiwi culture. Take the time to relax in paradise.
Tonight we dine in an award-winning local restaurant, where we’ll have a chance to sample some of the region’s best local food and wine.
Accommodation: Hush Cabins, Coromandel - (B,L,D)
Hiking time: 6-7 hours.
Driving time: 3 hours.


DAY FOUR – Epic East Coast

This morning we visit one of the top twenty beaches in the world, New Chums Beach. An unforgettable white sand, crescent moon-shaped beach, fringed by pohutukawa and nikau palms. Finding a secluded beach with no signs of man is an experience not to be missed! Note that this walk is dependent on tides.
We head into the laid-back coastal town Whitianga to catch a short ferry across the harbour and walk towards Shakespeare’s Cliff, which overlooks the beach where Captain Cook first set foot on New Zealand shores. Enjoy amazing views over Mercury Bay and Cooks Beach. We’ll stop for a picnic lunch above the spectacular Cathedral Cove, before walking down to the amazing natural archway - a must do for anyone coming to the Coromandel. Drop-off approx. 6pm to your Rotorua Hotel, and enjoy dinner in the Hotel restaurant.
Accommodation: Rotorua Lakeside Novotel Hotel - (B,L,D)
Hiking time: 2-3 hours.
Driving time: 3 hours


DAY FIVE – Whirinaki Forest

Pick-up from your Rotorua Hotel approx. 8:30am
We drive east, past the Kaiangaroa State forest, Mount Tarawera and into the heart of Te Urewera. Our first stop is the Whirinaki Dinosaur Forest, where we’ll hike through New Zealand’s most pristine podocarp forest with towering trees including giant totara, rimu, kahikatea and matai.
Keep an eye out for kaka (a large forest parrot) & whio (rare blue duck) along the way as they are known for frequenting the area. This hiking trail also skirts the moss-lined Whirinaki River canyon – one of the most picturesque rivers in New Zealand. After a picnic lunch we continue the incredible drive through the remote wilderness to Lake Waikaremoana, where we’ll settle in to our cosy lodge with pre-dinner drinks and nibbles on the lake shore.
Accommodation: Whakamarino Lodge - (L,D)
Hiking time: 3-4 hours.
Driving time: 4 hours.


DAY SIX – Panekire Bluffs

This morning we’ll begin our hike to the spectacular Panekire Bluffs that overlook Lake Waikaremoana. As we climb higher we’ll see the lush podocarp forest change into cloud forest with trees covered in fascinating hanging moss. Arriving at the Panekire bluffs, we are greeted with astounding views over Lake Waikaremoana and the endless forest-clad mountains of Te Urewera. What a place for a picnic!
If you’re looking for a challenge, there’s an option to continue hiking higher for a further 2 hours to reach the highest point of the Great Walk track to get views over not only the Lake, but out to the Pacific Coast, and even Mt Ruapehu on a clear day.
Before dinner we’ll visit a local marae for an informal chat with a local Maori elder. This is a great opportunity to get a real feel for the culture in this isolated area, where Maori is still the first language. (Note that because this is a genuine functioning marae occasionally we are unable to make this visit, due it being used by the community)
Accommodation: Whakamarino Lodge - (B,L,D)
Hiking time: 3-6 hours.
Driving time: 1 hour.


DAY SEVEN – Lake Waikareiti

After a hearty cooked breakfast we’ll stroll through impressive ancient beech forest up to the pristine Lake Waikareiti, which lies a further 300 metres in elevation above Lake Waikaremoana. Reached only by walking track, this lake is free of introduced aquatic plants and motorised boats, so has outstanding water clarity and is blissfully peaceful! If conditions allow we’ll explore this idyllic lake further by rowboat.
Later, we’ll return to Waikaremoana where there’s an option to walk to a dazzling clear fresh-water spring, or a hike through fern forest to explore the unusual Onepoto Caves. Another favourite walk follows the Aniwaniwa (definition = rainbow) River as it plunges over terraces and waterfalls on its journey to Lake Waikaremoana.
Accommodation: Whakamarino Lodge - (B,L,D)
Hiking time: 3-5 hours.
Driving time: 1 hour.


DAY EIGHT – Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk

This morning we’ll take a boat cruise right across Lake Waikaremoana to hike another section of the Great Walk Track. This stunning forest and lakeside trail traverses from a secluded arm of the lake through gorgeous tawa forest and across a peninsula, home to a Kiwi Recovery Program that is successfully increasing the numbers of our threatened national bird. After lunch we’ll continue to Rotorua, stopping for a soak in a natural hot spring under a canopy of native trees. Drop off to your Rotorua Hotel approx. 5-6pm. Tonight you will dine in one of Rotorua’s top restaurants.
Accommodation: Rotorua Lakeside Novotel Hotel - (B,L,D)
Hiking time: 2-4 hours
Driving time: 3 hours.


DAY NINE – Rest Day, Arrive Central Plateau

Have a day at your leisure in Rotorua after a cooked breakfast in the Hotel’s restaurant. We’ll pick you up approx. 1:30pm and head south, past the shores of Lake Taupo and into Tongariro National Park. Become acquainted with the area and your guide with a short walk, before settling in to your stunning accommodation in time to watch the sun set over the magnificent Tongariro volcanoes with a glass of wine and nibbles, before a delicious restaurant meal.
Accommodation: The Chateau Tongariro - (B,D)
Driving time Rotorua to Tongariro: 2.5 hours


DAY TEN – The Tongariro Alpine Crossing

This morning we’ll set off on one of the world’s greatest one day hikes, the Tongariro Alpine Crossing. This trail leads us through an incredible variety of ethereal landscapes - lava fields, emerald coloured crater lakes, steaming vents, alpine meadows, over an alpine pass, amidst the stunning mountain peaks – there’s nothing like it anywhere else on the planet! The views across to Mt Ngauruhoe, Mt Ruapehu and the central plateau of the North Island are simply spectacular and worth every step!
Fair weather and a good level of fitness are required to undertake this hike. If conditions allow we will have an early start on the track, so we can enjoy the pre-dawn solitude of the mountains and watch the sunrise over the volcanoes – a truly magical experience!
Return to the Chateau and revive your weary muscles in the plunge pool and sauna, before meeting in the Chateau’s stylish lounge for
pre-dinner aperitifs. Tonight we head out to a pub / restaurant for a casual meal with the locals.
Accommodation: The Chateau Tongariro - (B,L,D)
Hiking time: 7-8 hours, 19km, 900 m height gain.
Driving time: 45 mins


DAY ELEVEN – Mt Ruapehu Hikes

Travel around the southern side of Mt Ruapehu to experience some of New Zealand’s rail history on the Old Coach Road trail. Between 1906 to 1908 the road was used to carry passengers and goods by horse and coach, between two railheads on the main trunk line.
Heritage features on the trail include a unique cobbled road, massive steel viaducts, a curved tunnel, railway bridge remains, and old campsites. The 15km walk takes around 5 hours, and also passes through some beautiful stands of native forest with sweeping views across the district.
If conditions allow we will explore the dramatic, rock-strewn landscapes higher up Mt Ruapehu. At 2797 metres above sea level, the North Island’s highest mountain offers jaw-dropping views over the National Park with various hiking options or catch a chair-lift up to NZ’s highest café. Tonight we enjoy a final celebration dinner in The Chateau’s elegant Ruapehu Restaurant.
Accommodation: The Chateau Tongariro - (B,L,D)
Hiking time: approx. 5 hours.
Driving time: 1 hour


DAY TWELVE – Rainforest & Waterfalls

After breakfast we pack up and explore more of Tongariro National Park with a walk to Taranaki Falls. Tumbling 20 metres over the edge of an old lava flow, which erupted from Mt Ruapehu 15,000 years ago, the falls plunge into a boulder-ringed pool. The track passes through an interesting range of alpine meadows and beech forest, with expansive views of the mountains. Then hike around the glistening Lake Rotopounamu, a stunning jewel of a lake nestled in the side of an old volcanic mountain and totally fringed by native forest.
Approx. drop-off times: Taupo (4-5pm) or Rotorua (5-6pm).
Hiking time: 3-4 hours - (B,L)
Driving time Tongariro to Rotorua: 2.5 hours


Please note this itinerary may be modified. We like to keep the trip flexible to make the most of weather and alpine conditions, and so we can tailor the trip to suit the group. To maximise your experience and minimise drive times the guide may shuttle the vehicle, so some sections of trail may be walked without a guide. If this does occur your guide will ensure you are well-prepared for this. If you have any questions or concerns during the trip please discuss them with your guide – they are there to help you have the most enjoyable experience possible!

 

 

 

Accommodation:
  • Walking
 
Hrs, KM


Book now for Next Season!

 

2018 / 2019

2018

November 5,19
December 3, 10
 

2019

January 7, 14, 28
February 4,11,25
March 4,11,25
April 8

Another date in mind?

We can build a tour especially for your group, please enquire for dates available.

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What's Included

For dates, availability & customisations Enquire
 






Accommodation

 
A variety of boutique and character lodges & hotels, from 2-4 star, have been chosen for location and atmosphere. Rooms are twin-share or double, unless you’ve booked single supplement.

For the Coromandel section we stay in boutique, 3-star accommodation set amongst native bush. Rooms are a mixture of stand-alone cabins or inside the main house/lodge. Limited ensuite rooms are available, and must be booked in advance. Shared bathrooms are a short walk from your cabin. Usually we have dinner and breakfast in the alfresco (outdoor) kitchen to enjoy the beautiful bush views.

For the Waikaremoana section we stay in a quaint lodge / guest- house (2-3 star), on the shores of the picturesque Lake Whakamarino, within a small Maori village. Whakamarino means “tranquillity”. Rooms are twin or double with share bathrooms.
World-class trout-fishing can be found at the front door step, so bring your fishing gear!

The Chateau Tongariro is a 4-star historic hotel with AMAZING views of the mountains and National Park. An elegant lounge area provides the perfect place to relax and socialise with the group at the end of each day. The heated plunge pool and sauna are ideal for tired muscles! Rooms are studio twin or double with ensuite, upgrades to executive spa suites are available on request.

In addition the trip includes 2 nights in a studio room at a 4.5 star Hotel in Rotorua.


Meals

 
All dinners are included: 2-course Kiwi style meals, with plenty of fresh veges, salads, and dessert. We provide wine with pre-dinner nibbles; you can purchase extra drinks during dinner.

You are welcome to BYO additional alcohol to the Coromandel and Waikaremoana lodges.

Breakfasts have cooked and continental options, and packed lunches are made fresh daily. We also provide plenty of snacks on the trail.

The trip also includes 2 complimentary nights, with dinner (excluding drinks) and breakfast, at a 4-star Hotel in Rotorua.


Fitness

 
Most of the walking trails on the Bucket List Walk are of moderate difficulty, and range from well-formed paths to tracks broken with tree roots, rocks and mud.

A good level of fitness and agility is essential. Some of the trails are harder, such as The Pinnacles and Tongariro Crossing Walks, however there are easier options.

On average you should be able to walk for 4-5 hours a day and carry a daypack with your lunch, water, raincoat and jersey. We have good quality raincoats and daypacks you can borrow.

Training Tips
Being well prepared for this hike will increase your enjoyment of the experience.

Your pre-trip training should consist of several walks per week of 1-2 hours, with at least 1 longer walk per week (3-6 hours).

Gradually increase your walking times and distances. Make sure you include some hilly terrain or stairs, and carry a daypack.
Train in the clothing and footwear you intend to wear during the trip.

Contact us if you would like some more advice on fitness and training.
 


Bucket List Walk Packing List…

Essential Items:
  • Day-pack
  • Warm hat & gloves
  • Drink bottle (up to 2 litres capacity for Tongariro Crossing Walk)
  • Personal toiletries, shampoo, and medications
  • Sunscreen & sunhat
  • Camera & charger
Clothing:
  • Boots or good walking shoes (worn in please!)
  • Raincoat (we lend raincoats by prior request)
  • Hiking Socks (about 3 pairs, wool is best. Well-fitting hiking socks greatly reduce the occurrence of blisters)
  • Shorts or light weight trousers
  • Thermal underwear (full set, long-sleeved & long-legged, polypropylene or wool)
  • Short-sleeved shirts (preferably polypropylene or wool: merino wool is ideal)
  • Long-sleeved shirt or light sweater
  • Warm wool or polar fleece jersey
  • Clothes & shoes for the evenings (casual)
  • PJ’s / sleepwear
Spare clothing: Extra socks and thermal layers are always handy. Even though it is summer you must be prepared for cold conditions - ensure you have enough warm items.

Optional Items:
  • Bathing suit & towel (beach and hot-pool swimming opportunities)
  • Walking stick (highly recommended for those with weak knees, ankles or hips)
  • Light walking shoes or sandals for easy walks
  • Waterproof over trousers
  • Insect repellent (insects are rarely a problem)
  • Lunch-box to protect your sandwiches (otherwise we provide lunch bags)
  • Small torch
  • Motion sickness tablets if you are prone to car sickness
  • Blister kit or plasters
We supply:
  • Most meals, snacks, hot & cold drinks (see itinerary for details)
  • Wine & beer with pre-dinner nibbles
  • Bed linen, bath towels, pillows & blankets
  • Toilet paper & Soap
Note:
Sorry, there are no drying rooms at the lodges.
To prevent the spread of noxious weeds and plant diseases, please clean your boots and walking sticks thoroughly before the hike.


Book now for Next Season!

 

2018 / 2019

2018

November 5,19
December 3, 10
 

2019

January 7, 14, 28
February 4,11,25
March 4,11,25
April 8

Another date in mind?

We can build a tour especially for your group, please enquire for dates available.

btn enquire


brochurebutton

 

 


Photos

For dates, availability & customisations Enquire
 








Book now for Next Season!

 

2018 / 2019

2018

November 5,19
December 3, 10
 

2019

January 7, 14, 28
February 4,11,25
March 4,11,25
April 8

Another date in mind?

We can build a tour especially for your group, please enquire for dates available.

btn enquire


brochurebutton

 

 


History

For dates, availability & customisations Enquire
 







Lake Waikaremoana

People


Whalers were the first Europeans to arrive. Warmonger and maori chief Te Rauparaha (author of the All Blacks’ haka) spent a lot of time in the region, and ongoing disputes over land rights in the region led to a bloody confrontation between him and a party led by members of The New Zealand Company.
Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk  Wildlife
Fantastic colour in this forest fungus
waikare Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk
Awesome!
fantail, waikare Lake Waikaremoana Great Walk
New Zealand Native Fantail


Flora and Fauna

Flora: The vegetation of the Waikaremoana area forms a protective green cloak, mantling countless ridges and valleys. There are more than 650 types of native plant present in the park, some nationally rare. The vegetation pattern is ever changing - disturbances by volcanic activity, fire and storm damage, possum and deer have modified the forest in many areas. The lowering of the lake for power generation has encouraged forest regeneration along the shore.

Fauna: Many birds live in the forest. Among the more notable are kereru (wood pigeon), kaka (forest parrot), kakariki (parakeet), North Island robin, New Zealand falcon and rifleman, and at night, morepork (forest owl) and North Island brown kiwi.

Grey, mallard and paradise ducks are common on the lake edge, and New Zealand scaup, kingfishers and white faced herons are found in sheltered areas.

Both of New Zealand's rare native bat species, the long-tailed and short-tailed, are present in the park.

Deer, pigs and possums are found throughout Te Urewera National Park. They have a major impact on the ecology of the forest and its bird life. DOC encourages hunting of these animals and permits are available free from any DOC office in the East Coast Hawke's Bay.

 
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Tongariro


World Heritage Status……

The area in which you will be walking was designated a National Park on the 23rd of September 1887. Te Heuheu, the Paramount Chief of the Ngati Tuwharetoa people, gifted 2,630ha of the central volcano area to the New Zealand Government, including the summits of Tongariro, Ngauruhoe and Ruapehu. His generosity secured access to the mountains for everyone.

In January 1991 Tongariro National Park was declared a World Heritage site, in recognition of its outstanding natural characteristics.

In 1994 the Park was also granted Cultural World Heritage status, in recognition of its cultural significance and history.

 

People


Approximately one million people visit Tongariro National Park each year, with summer visitors now outnumbering winter visitors as they take advantage of the excellent tramping and walking opportunities. Halfway between Auckland and Wellington, the park is easily reached from both city areas. Ruapehu has the only commercial skifields in the North Island. This also makes the mountain a popular place to visit. Turoa ski area is on the south-west side of the mountain and the small club field, Tukino, on the south-east. Whakapapa ski area is on the western slopes. Temperatures at Whakapapa Village can be as cold as -10°C or as warm as 25°C. Frosts can occur at any time of the year. At Whakapapa the yearly rainfall is about 2,200 mm, while on the Desert Road side it is only 1,250 mm.

It is unusual to have a village within a national park but Whakapapa Village was established early in the history of the park when people's opinions about conservation were different to what they are today.

About 150 people live permanently in Whakapapa over summer. This number increases to about 400 over the winter months. Whakapapa Village is New Zealand's highest settlement with permanent residents.

The ski lodges at Whakapapa skifield make up what is called Iwikau Village, named after one of the earlier Tuwharetoa chiefs.

The first club lodge was built by Ruapehu Ski Club in 1923. There are 47 private club lodges at Iwikau and a further five in Whakapapa Village.
possum Tongariro Crossing Walk Tour
This little fellow destroys our forests
kakabeak Tongariro Crossing Walk Tour
NZ Kakabeak
tonga, Tongariro Crossing Walk Tour
There it is!


Tongariro Facts


Tongariro National Park is approximately 79,598 hectares.

Tongariro was the first national park formed in New Zealand and the fourth in the world. It was the first National Park in the world to be gifted by a country's indigenous people. The park is centred on three active volcanoes: Tongariro (1,968 metres), Ruapehu (2,797 metres), and Ngauruhoe (2,290metres).

Mt Ruapehu has a number of peaks:
  • Tahurangi 2,797 metres
  • Girdlestone 2,658 metres
  • Te Heuheu 2,732 metres
  • Paretetaitonga 2,751 metres
  • Mitre 2,591 metres

More Facts
  • Traditionally Ngauruhoe has erupted at least every nine years.
  • Mt Tongariro's active Red Crater last emitted ash in 1926.
  • Mt Ruapehu is the highest point in the North Island and, like Tongariro, its history began before the last ice age.
  • The eight named glaciers on Mt Ruapehu are the only glaciers in the North Island.
  • On top of Ruapehu is a crater lake which regularly passes through warming cycles. These cycles may result in small eruptions of ash and steam.
  • More than 60 eruptions from the crater have been recorded since 1945, including 1995/96 when the Crater Lake disappeared completely. Since the 1995/96 eruption the crater lake has begun to reform.
  • Ruapehu has a permanent cover of snow and ice, including seven glaciers.

Coromandel


People


Early Maori: Around 1250–1300 Maori arrived in the Coromandel. Being extremely rich in fish and building materials the area proved very popular and was soon settled. Maori from the area provided vast amounts of food for their neighbours in Auckland during the 1840’s and 1850’s.

Europeans: From the 1830's British ships arrived and Europeans started to mill native timbers which were much sought after for the ship building industry. The Europeans freely traded with local Maori. They bartered with the Maori for food and labour in return for muskets and tools.


Flora and Fauna


Flora: The Coromandel has a real mix of vegetation from sub tropical through to sub alpine.On the summits sub-alpine plants are found, and just below are vast areas of regenerating conifer–broadleaf forests. Little of the original Coromandel forests survive today.

Fauna: The Coromandel Peninsula has some very rare and different fauna. Found only in the northern Coromandel is a strange and rare insect - the Moehau Stag Beetle, which hides away in moist and secluded environments. NZ only has four native frogs one of which is called Archey’s frog. Archey’s frogs are found in the Coromandel but are very elusive and rare.

Coromandel Harbour is the site of a breeding programme for the endangered North Island weka. It is also one of the homes of the reef heron.

Possums, pigs and goats are plentiful all of which provide hunters with plenty of options.

NZ Weka! Wildlife Tours
NZ Weka!
kauri NZ Wildlife Tours
Kauri Tree Stump!
archeys frog NZ  Wildlife Tours
Archey's Frog


Industry

Kauri Timber and Gum: Kauri trees dominated the Coromandel in early years until they were all milled for their beautiful honey coloured timber much prized by the European settlers. By the late 1800s most kauri trees were cut down. Kauri gum was then dug out of the ground for making things such as varnish.

Gold mining: The region was rich in gold, but mining ended in most parts of the region in the 1920s. It started again in 1987.

Farming and Tourism: Very important industries in the Coromandel region today.


Book now for Next Season!

 

2018 / 2019

2018

November 5,19
December 3, 10
 

2019

January 7, 14, 28
February 4,11,25
March 4,11,25
April 8

Another date in mind?

We can build a tour especially for your group, please enquire for dates available.

btn enquire


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